Fryday Produce Networking Events For Professionals

Set Up Networking Meetings In Sudan

Become Fryday Representative and Get a Top Level Professional Network

The Benefits of Being a Fryday Representative in Sudan

Training And Support Provided

You become an event management and professional networking expert.

You Get An Excellent Professional Network

You will get a top level professional network locally and internationally.

Proven Business Model

You get a proven business model and can start making money right away after starting Fryday in your city.

Digital Marketing Platform

Fryday developed a solution that will help you to stay ahead in digital marketing.

Advice About Setting Up Fryday’s Networking Meetings In Sudan

People who attend Fryday’s networking meetings are mostly internationally oriented professionals with a senior position, many own small and medium sized businesses.
Fryday is eager to have the same balance at the networking meetings also in Sudan.
Fryday encourage diversity at the networking meetings and has succeeded in attracting a good mix of men, women, age groups, professions and ationalities.
People don’t have to pre-register to attend Fryday’s meetings, can come and leave at any time, can bring friends and colleagues as they wish and are not equired to participate in any program or other activity at Fryday’s networking meetings. This model with a free format has worked very well in all the places where Fryday has established itself and will surely work also in Sudan.

$24.99 per month Proceed

Prices and Conditions

No other fees than the below applies. You keep all the extra income yourself. Fryday has no notice period so you can cancel the agreement by stop paying but be aware that your exclusive rights to Fryday are then forfeited and somebody else will be able to take over your community.

What Representatives
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Fryday Premium Partners

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Hyatt Regency Hotel
Carlsberg beer
Fairmont
Lego
InterContinental
Nestle
Hilton
Mercedes
Marriott Astana
Heineken
Martini
Hard Rock Cafe

Photos from Fryday's networking events

Sudan

Military regimes favoring Islamic-oriented governments have dominated national politics since independence from Anglo-Egyptian co-rule in 1956. Sudan was embroiled in two prolonged civil wars during most of the remainder of the 20th century. These conflicts were rooted in northern economic, political, and social domination of largely non-Muslim, non-Arab southern Sudanese. The first civil war ended in 1972 but another broke out in 1983. Peace talks gained momentum in 2002-04 with the signing of several accords. The final North/South Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA), signed in January 2005, granted the southern rebels autonomy for six years followed by a referendum on independence for Southern Sudan. The referendum was held in January 2011 and indicated overwhelming support for independence. South Sudan became independent on 9 July 2011. Sudan and South Sudan have yet to fully implement security and economic agreements signed in September 2012 relating to the normalization of relations between the two countries. The final disposition of the contested Abyei region has also to be decided.
Since South Sudan's independence, conflict has broken out between the government and the Sudan People's Liberation Movement-North in Southern Kordofan and Blue Nile states, which has resulted in 1.2 million internally displaced persons or severely affected persons needing humanitarian assistance. A separate conflict, which broke out in the western region of Darfur in 2003, displaced nearly two million people and caused an estimated 200,000 to 400,000 deaths. Violence in Darfur in 2013 resulted in an additional estimated 6,000 civilians killed and 500,000 displaced. The UN and the African Union have jointly commanded a Darfur peacekeeping operation known as the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) since 2007. Peacekeeping troops have struggled to stabilize the situation and have increasingly become targets for attacks by armed groups. Sudan also has faced refugee influxes from neighboring countries, primarily Ethiopia, Eritrea, Chad, Central African Republic, and South Sudan. Armed conflict, poor transport infrastructure, and government denial of access have impeded the provision of humanitarian assistance to affected populations.

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Any questions?

If you have any questions about becoming Fryday's Representative feel free to contact us