Fryday Produce Networking Events For Professionals

Become Fryday's Representative in Syria!

And Get a Top Level Professional Network

Fryday Is Looking For Somebody To Run Its Networking Events Franchise In Syria

Fryday is an international network of professionals that produce networking events and is now looking for persons for its networking events franchise in Syria. Fryday operates as a franchise and is planning to launch its networking events all over the world. Fryday’s event franchise has a low fee, is easy to run and makes good money. Sign up now to take advantage of the opportunity in Syria or contact us if you have questions.

The Benefits of Being a Fryday Representative in Syria

You Get An Excellent Professional Network

You will get a top level professional network locally and internationally.

Proven Business Model

You get a proven business model and can start making money right away after starting Fryday in your city.

Digital Marketing Platform

Fryday developed a solution that will help you to stay ahead in digital marketing.

Social Standing

Being Fryday’s Representative will make you well known and respected in the business community.

Sign-up For Fryday’s Events Franchise In Syria Now!

No obligations. You can quit whenever you want.
Become well connected and a local socialite in Syria.
Make good money from events franchise in Syria.
Become a networking expert.
Get great experience in event management.
Get access to Fryday’s knowledge and experience from many years of networking events production.
Fryday has a well tested business model that works all over the world.
You will have the exclusive rights to Fryday’s brand and system in Syria.
Being an event organizer is very rewarding. You will make money and have fun at the same time.
Enjoy Fryday’s free format. Work when you want, where you want and how you want.
Set your own ambitions and work as much or as little as you want.
Fryday’s events franchise is easy to manage and a good way to start your career in business.
Somebody else might take Fryday’s events franchise before you so sign-up now or contact us if you have any questions!

Fryday Franchise

Fryday is a very affordable Franchise with no starting fee. Fryday Representatives pay the monthly fee for the exclusive rights to use to Fryday's system, brand and access to its knowledge and material in a specified area.

$24.99 per month Proceed

Prices and Conditions

No other fees than the below applies. You keep all the extra income yourself. Fryday has no notice period so you can cancel the agreement by stop paying but be aware that your exclusive rights to Fryday are then forfeited and somebody else will be able to take over your community.

Any questions?

If you have any questions about becoming Fryday's Representative feel free to contact us

What Representatives
Say about Fryday

Fryday Premium Partners

Want to become a Partner? Learn more

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Fairmont
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Hyatt Regency Hotel
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Crossover

Photos from Fryday's networking events

Syria

Following World War I, France acquired a mandate over the northern portion of the former Ottoman Empire province of Syria. The French administered the area as Syria until granting it independence in 1946. The new country lacked political stability and experienced a series of military coups. Syria united with Egypt in February 1958 to form the United Arab Republic. In September 1961, the two entities separated, and the Syrian Arab Republic was reestablished. In the 1967 Arab-Israeli War, Syria lost the Golan Heights region to Israel. During the 1990s, Syria and Israel held occasional, albeit unsuccessful, peace talks over its return. In November 1970, Hafiz al-ASAD, a member of the socialist Ba'th Party and the minority Alawi sect, seized power in a bloodless coup and brought political stability to the country. Following the death of President Hafiz al-ASAD, his son, Bashar al-ASAD, was approved as president by popular referendum in July 2000. Syrian troops - stationed in Lebanon since 1976 in an ostensible peacekeeping role - were withdrawn in April 2005. During the July-August 2006 conflict between Israel and Hizballah, Syria placed its military forces on alert but did not intervene directly on behalf of its ally Hizballah. In May 2007, Bashar al-ASAD's second term as president was approved by popular referendum.
Influenced by major uprisings that began elsewhere in the region, and compounded by additional social and economic factors, antigovernment protests broke out first in the southern province of Dar'a in March 2011 with protesters calling for the repeal of the restrictive Emergency Law allowing arrests without charge, the legalization of political parties, and the removal of corrupt local officials. Demonstrations and violent unrest spread across Syria with the size and intensity of protests fluctuating. The government responded to unrest with a mix of concessions - including the repeal of the Emergency Law, new laws permitting new political parties, and liberalizing local and national elections - and military force. However, the government's response has failed to meet opposition demands for ASAD's resignation, and the government's ongoing violence to quell unrest and widespread armed opposition activity has led to extended clashes between government forces and oppositionists. International pressure on the ASAD regime has intensified since late 2011, as the Arab League, EU, Turkey, and the US expanded economic sanctions against the regime. In December 2012, the Syrian National Coalition, was recognized by more than 130 countries as the sole legitimate representative of the Syrian people. Peace talks between the Coalition and Syrian regime at the UN-sponsored Geneva II conference in 2014 failed to produce a resolution of the conflict. Unrest continues in Syria, and according to an April 2016 UN estimate, the death toll among Syrian Government forces, opposition forces, and civilians had reached 400,000. As of January 2016, approximately 13.5 million people were in need of humanitarian assistance in Syria, with 6.5 million people displaced internally, and an additional 4.8 million Syrian refugees, making the Syrian situation the largest humanitarian crisis worldwide.

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