Fryday Produce Networking Events For Professionals

Open Easy Networking Events Franchise In New York

Become Fryday Representative and Get a Top Level Professional Network

Fryday Is Opening Its Easy Networking Events Franchise In New York



Fryday is an international network of professionals that produce networking events.



Fryday is a networking events franchise and is now ready to launch in New York. Fryday’s networking events franchise is easy to work with and will give you a good income. Sign up now to take advantage of the easy franchise opportunity in New York or contact us for more information.


The Benefits of Being a Fryday Representative in New York

Coaching

Fryday’s management will provide you with all the coaching you need to succeed.

Run Your Own Company

You will have the freedom and learning opportunities that come with running your company, which is something many people dream of having.

Work From Home

You can work from home if that suits your lifestyle. You can also work when you want which improves your freedom even more.

Start-Up Experience

Running Fryday in your city is like running a start-up but much safer. You will earn a lot of valuable start-up experience.

Running Fryday’s Event Franchise In New York is Easy!



Think about yourself standing in the middle of the business community in your city being the person who made them all come to your event and being the one person who knows the most of them, the person they all want to meet.



Fryday has four distinct concepts in its easy event franchise that you can use and adapt to the market in New York. Afterwork, Professional Networking, Trainings and Breakfast Meetings. Each concept has its own unique benefits and even though many guests are attending several of the formats having several concepts opens up a wider market.



Become a part of Fryday’s successful community and go ahead with Fryday’s easy event franchise in New York today! Sign up below or contact us if you have any questions!


Message About Opening Fryday’s Easy Networking Events Franchise In New York

Fryday offers its guests a forum for networking with active, international professionals and that has been proven very attractive.
Fryday Afterwork is the end of the week free networking events typically starting in the early evening of Fridays in a down town venue. Come and meet interesting people in a very relaxed format.
By opening Fryday’s networking events franchise in New York you will be authorized to carry out the commercial activities that are included in Fryday’s networking events franchise and will be given the exclusive rights to Fryday’s brand, system, knowledge database and experience and also receive regular training and coaching to make sure you will be a successful Representative in New York.

$24.99 per month Proceed

Prices and Conditions

No other fees than the below applies. You keep all the extra income yourself. Fryday has no notice period so you can cancel the agreement by stop paying but be aware that your exclusive rights to Fryday are then forfeited and somebody else will be able to take over your community.

Any questions?

If you have any questions about becoming Fryday's Representative feel free to contact us

What Representatives
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Fryday Premium Partners

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Photos from Fryday's networking events

New York

New York City, officially the City of New York, historically New Amsterdam, the Mayor, Alderman, and Commonality of the City of New York, and New Orange, byname the Big Apple, city and port located at the mouth of the Hudson River, southeastern New York state, northeastern U.S. It is the largest and most influential American metropolis, encompassing Manhattan and Staten islands, the western sections of Long Island, and a small portion of the New York state mainland to the north of Manhattan. New York City is in reality a collection of many neighbourhoods scattered among the city’s five boroughs—Manhattan, Brooklyn, the Bronx, Queens, and Staten Island—each exhibiting its own lifestyle. Moving from one city neighbourhood to the next may be like passing from one country to another. New York is the most populous and the most international city in the country. Its urban area extends into adjoining parts of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut. Located where the Hudson and East rivers empty into one of the world’s premier harbours, New York is both the gateway to the North American continent and its preferred exit to the oceans of the globe. Area 305 square miles (790 square km). Pop. (2000) 8,008,278; New York–White Plains–Wayne Metro Division, 11,296,377; New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island Metro Area, 18,323,002; (2010) 8,175,133; New York–White Plains–Wayne Metro Division, 11,576,251; New York–Northern New Jersey–Long Island Metro Area, 18,897,109.


The Economy
Early industries
The seal of the city of New York, adopted in 1686, includes the beaver and the flour barrel, images that document the first major phase of Manhattan’s economic history. New Amsterdam was important to the Dutch because it offered access to the immensely valuable fur trade of a continent. One of the richest men in 19th-century New York was John Jacob Astor, whose fortune was based on fur before he became a real estate speculator. After the British conquest in 1664, the city won a monopoly to grind and pack grain and sent its flour to all world markets. Merchant incomes soared as commerce, both legitimate and via smuggling, became the lifeblood of New York. Any threat to city prosperity was harshly dealt with, and William Kidd’s turn from privateering to piracy led him to the gallows (in London) in 1701.

Shipping and transportation
The shipping enterprise has always characterized New York. Its Dutch-English merchant class dominated the colonial assembly and after 1756 controlled the annual salary grant awarded to the royal governor. A group of 20 merchants organized the country’s first chamber of commerce (1768) at a time when small manufacturing establishments—cloth, timber processing, ropes, and sails—were becoming more common. Rapidly overcoming years of British occupation during the American Revolution, the city filled Caribbean, European, and coastal ports with its vessels within a decade of independence. New Yorkers were the ones who sent the Empress of China on its historic first voyage to East Asia in 1784, and Manhattan was the national leader in both exports and imports by the late 1790s. When inventor Robert Fulton’s steamboat, the Clermont, made its first trip to Albany in 32 hours in 1807, it revolutionized transportation. New York launched the first scheduled shipping to Europe, and its thriving boatyards constructed every type of vessel from harbour lighters to inland steamers to transatlantic passenger ships. Walt Whitman was enthralled by the “tall masts” that turned South Street into a forest. The yacht America (1851), first winner of the race henceforth called America’s Cup, was built there as were many of the fabled clipper ships, the fastest sailing vessels in history. From 1830 until the 1950s New York ranked as the busiest port in the world.

Banking and finance
Commercial banking began in Manhattan in 1784 when the Bank of New York opened for business. It was soon joined by a branch of the First Bank of the United States (1792) and the Manhattan Company (1799), ancestor of what is now The Chase Manhattan Corporation. The origins of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) can be traced to the Buttonwood Agreement of 1792, although the Exchange Board itself was not organized until 1817. After the Erie Canal opened in 1825, banking services became even more centred in the city, and when its merchants entered the cotton trade the commerce of the entire nation flowed into the port. Several financial panics in the 19th century could not prevent the city from dominating the national money markets. Investors and banks from the metropolis provided much of the capital that financed the industrialization of the United States. So great was the influence of New York that the country’s largest firms found it expedient to locate their headquarters there even though—as with Carnegie Steel, American Tobacco, and Standard Oil—the focus of their manufacturing was elsewhere.

The development of industry and trade
Shipping and finance secured New York’s international standing, but manufacturing provided jobs for its teeming population. A multitude of small businesses were centred in Manhattan by the 1850s, and the clothing, furniture, pianos, cigars, and dozens of other products they created boosted city exports. By mid-century New York was the printing centre of the United States with more than 1,000 establishments; in the period 1865–85 the number of magazines published in the city quintupled to 3,300. The influx of skilled Jewish immigrants transformed an already dominant clothing industry into a gargantuan one, employing nearly half of all city workers by 1910. Thus, the interaction of capital, cheap labour, access to raw materials, entrepreneurial initiative, and transportation facilities made New York the ideal place of business. It quickly developed advertising, insurance, and legal services to deal with the needs of its burgeoning manufacturing sector.

The centre of business
By the beginning of the 20th century, New York was the headquarters for more than two-thirds of the top 100 American corporations, and its 25,000 factories manufactured several hundred different industrial products. It led the nation in total factory workers, number of factories, capital valuation, and product value. New York held its leadership position for another three generations and provided nearly one million industrial jobs into the 1950s. In 1960–75 the city lost more than 600,000 of these jobs, as its old economy collapsed and an information age took shape. Banking and financial services became the new engine of development—abetted by the traditional print and advertising sectors of the economy—while white-collar workers with computer skills replaced most of the blue-collar labourers of the past. Although much has been made of the move of clothing production out of New York, it remains the city’s leading industry, and sweatshop conditions reminiscent of the early 1900s still exist in small factories in the Bronx and Queens. Despite all of these changes, the metropolitan area is home to more than one-fifth of the Fortune 500 companies.

The 1970s represented a low point for New York; its national reputation collapsed as the government experienced virtual bankruptcy. High rents, congestion, arson, and crime led to an exodus by businesses and the middle class even after the city began the rebuilding process. Industrial parks, where businesses were given cheaper rents, better utilities, and safety, were authorized in response to the crisis, and major tax incentives were granted to those corporations that remained in the city. The NYSE even threatened to leave, but in the late 1990s it agreed to remain in Manhattan and to construct a new facility. The port, where facilities were outmoded and corruption endemic, began to convert its docks for containerized shipping, to dredge deeper channels, and to plan a direct rail connection between Manhattan and Brooklyn. Old piers were dismantled or converted to other uses, such as amusement centres.

By constantly enhancing its key economic advantages, New York has remained prosperous even as it underwent change, its strength lying in its diversity. The port, which lost some percentage of its shipping to other cities (notably New Orleans, Louisiana; Baltimore, Maryland; and Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada), is still the busiest port on the East Coast and generates billions of dollars of revenue, creates thousands of jobs, and is the focus of major plans for renewal and renovation. Manufacturing positions have declined, but smaller specialty producers of neckties, purses, and leather goods have joined the ready-made-clothing industry to maintain New York’s dominance. A major portion of the country’s software and computer-related industry has located itself in New York and built an urban “Silicon Alley” to mirror California’s Silicon Valley. The city’s continuing financial supremacy was apparent in the 1990s, a decade in which the Dow Jones average quadrupled, and profits for the members of the NYSE soared. New York marketed its monetary expertise to the globe; its banks dealt with the Latin American debt crisis of the 1980s as well as the Asian financial meltdown of the late 1990s, and in the process the city became the “economic capital of the world.” The vast numbers of bars, restaurants, hotels, health clubs, and theatres across New York are necessary to care for and feed the millions of visitors who come to the city annually.

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